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TV & Film What Do You Think About "Fake" Animal Cruelty in Films?

Joe

Celebrity Member
I was watching the Rob Reiner film And So It Goes. There is a scene in the film where a stray dog is taking a dump on Michael Douglas's lawn as he is pulling into the driveway. Douglas stops the car, pulls a paintball gun out of his trunk, and shoots the dog in the rump, painting it phosphorescent green. The dog runs away yelping. Douglas smiles sadistically and says, "You have a present for me? Well, I have a present for you!"

The scene was designed to show what a nasty guy Douglas is at the beginning of the movie, and how he is gradually humanized by his experiences during the film.

But this would really be a cruel thing to do. At the end of the film is the notice from the American Humane Association that no animals were harmed during this film. Yet the scene looked quite realistic.

So what do you make of this kind of thing? I was a bit repulsed by the apparent cruelty depicted.
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
I'm opposed to it, on the grounds that we really don't need to be giving all those borderline psychos out there any ideas. Or children, for that matter. Or anyone who is easily influenced.
 
M

Moll Flanders

Guest
I don't like it either, I remember being really creeped out by a film with Ashton Kutcher called The Butterfly Effect with the boy that hurt his dog.

I usually have to cover my eyes during parts of a lot of films and TV shows.:oops:
 

Mikkel

Addicted Poster
Location
Norway
I can se most horror movies without ever getting scared, don't care about watching people being tortured or killed in the most horribe ways and such things. But when a dog dies in a movie, I cry almost every time. I don't like cruelty against animals in films at all. It hurts when someone is mean to a animal there, but I really don't care about humans. Then it just a film.

But wildlife documentaries goes well, as I know the nature is brutal. But it's about survival, not being cruel to animals.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I can se most horror movies without ever getting scared, don't care about watching people being tortured or killed in the most horribe ways and such things. But when a dog dies in a movie, I cry almost every time. I don't like cruelty against animals in films at all. It hurts when someone is mean to a animal there, but I really don't care about humans. Then it just a film.

But wildlife documentaries goes well, as I know the nature is brutal. But it's about survival, not being cruel to animals.
This reminds me of the film Marley and Me. I was watching it on board a flight coming back from LA and was crying buckets. The hostess looked puzzled and when she saw what I was watching told me that she also cried when she watched the heartbreaking scene were Marley dies.
 

Mikkel

Addicted Poster
Location
Norway
This reminds me of the film Marley and Me. I was watching it on board a flight coming back from LA and was crying buckets. The hostess looked puzzled and when she saw what I was watching told me that she also cried when she watched the heartbreaking scene were Marley dies.
I should probably not write this, but I cried to "Air Buddies". :p I felt so sorry for the kid just wanted to have a dog friend. I'm so happy for my own dog friends, so of cause everyone want a dog friend.

I can't watch movies like Cujo and Pet Sematary. I get nightmares. But I fall asleep to things like Saw. :p
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I should probably not write this, but I cried to "Air Buddies". :p I felt so sorry for the kid just wanted to have a dog friend. I'm so happy for my own dog friends, so of cause everyone want a dog friend.

I can't watch movies like Cujo and Pet Sematary. I get nightmares. But I fall asleep to things like Saw. :p
I can't watch films were animals die or are neglected. I have a hard time coping with the ones in my neighbourhood.:(
 
But this would really be a cruel thing to do. At the end of the film is the notice from the American Humane Association that no animals were harmed during this film. Yet the scene looked quite realistic.

So what do you make of this kind of thing? I was a bit repulsed by the apparent cruelty depicted.
It's possible they actually did shoot the dog. The AHA's idea of cruelty is different than most people's and they let the film industry get away with a lot, and a large number of animals have died during filming while under their watch. They will still put the disclaimer up when there's been a death or injury.

I'd prefer if they didn't use animals period, whether or not they show cruelty to them. It's stressful just being on a busy, noisy set all day, and being forced to preform the same stunt over and over and over again, sometimes for hours.
 

RascalsMom

Addicted Poster
I don't like it either, I remember being really creeped out by a film with Ashton Kutcher called The Butterfly Effect with the boy that hurt his dog.

I usually have to cover my eyes during parts of a lot of films and TV shows.:oops:
I seen that movie when I was 14 and OMG. It was really messed up. I was at a friends house, and I totally freaked.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
It's possible they actually did shoot the dog. The AHA's idea of cruelty is different than most people's and they let the film industry get away with a lot, and a large number of animals have died during filming while under their watch. They will still put the disclaimer up when there's been a death or injury.

I'd prefer if they didn't use animals period, whether or not they show cruelty to them. It's stressful just being on a busy, noisy set all day, and being forced to preform the same stunt over and over and over again, sometimes for hours.
That is just plain disgusting. More people should be made aware of this.
 
That is just plain disgusting. More people should be made aware of this.
American Humane Association monitor Gina Johnson confided in an email to a colleague on April 7, 2011, about the star tiger in Ang Lee’s Life of Pi. While many scenes featuring “Richard Parker,” the Bengal tiger who shares a lifeboat with a boy lost at sea, were created using CGI technology, King, very much a real animal, was employed when the digital version wouldn’t suffice. “This one take with him just went really bad and he got lost trying to swim to the side,” Johnson wrote. “Damn near drowned.”...

...A year later, during the filming of another blockbuster, Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, 27 animals reportedly perished, including sheep and goats that died from dehydration and exhaustion or from drowning in water-filled gullies, during a hiatus in filming at an unmonitored New Zealand farm where they were being housed and trained. A trainer, John Smythe, tells THR that AHA’s management, which assigned a representative to the production, resisted investigating when he brought the issue to its attention in August 2012. ...

...A THR investigation has found that, unbeknownst to the public, these incidents on Hollywood’s most prominent productions are but two of the troubling cases of animal injury and death that directly call into question the 136-year-old Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit’s assertion that “No Animals Were Harmed” on productions it monitors. Alarmingly, it turns out that audiences reassured by the organization’s famous disclaimer should not necessarily assume it is true. In fact, the AHA has awarded its “No Animals Were Harmed” credit to films and TV shows on which animals were injured during production. It justifies this on the grounds that the animals weren’t intentionally harmed or the incidents occurred while cameras weren’t rolling....

...A Husky dog was punched repeatedly in its diaphragm on Disney’s 2006 Antarctic sledding movie Eight Below, starring Paul Walker, and a chipmunk was fatally squashed in Paramount’s 2006 Matthew McConaughey-Sarah Jessica Parker romantic comedy Failure to Launch. In 2003, the AHA chose not to publicly speak of the dozens of dead fish and squidthat washed up on shore over four days during the filming of Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. Crewmembers had taken no precautions to protect marine life when they set off special-effects explosions in the ocean, according to the AHA rep on set.

And the list goes on: An elderly giraffe died on Sony’s 2011 Zookeeper set and dogs suffering from bloat and cancer died during the production of New Regency’s Marmaduke and The Weinstein Co.’s Our Idiot Brother, respectively (an AHA spokesman confirms the dogs had bloat and says the cancer “was not work-related”). In March, a 5-foot-long shark died after being placed in a small inflatable pool during a Kmart commercial shoot in Van Nuys...
Animals Were Harmed: Hollywood's Nightmare of Death, Injury, and Secrecy Exposed | Hollywood Reporter Exclusive
 

Joe

Celebrity Member
I'm opposed to it, on the grounds that we really don't need to be giving all those borderline psychos out there any ideas. Or children, for that matter. Or anyone who is easily influenced.
(Emphasis added.)

Your comments--and many of those of other people in this thread--have given me an idea. Maybe not the greatest, and maybe more applicable to American films. American films are "Rated" by the MPAA allegedly so that parents can protect children from improper influences. The ratings consist of not only a letter but a "box" spelling out why a film got that letter, i.e., spelling out what parents might reasonably be concerned about or find objectionable.

Well, why not have a category of "scenes of simulated animal abuse or cruelty" along with other things affecting a film's rating now,
like smoking, drug use, profanity, nudity, etc.?
 

Amy SF

Dweller in nature
I really hate all the movie comedies where the stage is set for some poor cat to get hurt or killed - we see the cat, and then we hear a loud off-screen "MROW!", implying that something "got" the cat, and it's always played for laughs, and what's worse, nobody seems to really care that the cat got hurt or killed. What is so damned funny about this kind of thing, even if we don't see it happen?

There is one movie where this happens, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, and I really like this movie, except for that part. It mars the movie for me.
 

FortyTwo

Custom Title
I think it's just like any other violent content in films - it has to be looked at in the context of the film, and not as a blanket statement.

As for actually hurting animals to create scenes like this, obviously that should never be done. And the AHA is definitely too lenient and inattentive when it comes to these sorts of things. There are many cheap and simple ways to pull off effects without hurting animals, especially in this day and age.

I should probably not write this, but I cried to "Air Buddies". :p I felt so sorry for the kid just wanted to have a dog friend. I'm so happy for my own dog friends, so of cause everyone want a dog friend.
When I look at the ungodly film series Air Buddies spawned, I cry not for a lonely child, but for humanity.
 
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