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The Cat Lovers Thread

Mischief

Stranger in a strange land
I know it's the common perception, but in reality, I've ad t gs with phobias, separation anxieties, a need for certain rituals akin to what would be considered obssessive-compulsive disorders in humans, etc.

I haven't encountered anything like that with all of the cats with whom I've lived. I suspect that the more domesticated a species gets, the more psychological problems develop.
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
From VK social network.
"Kitties' noses as an independent kind of art".:kitty:
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This is a poem, actually, but i can translate it only literally (and i doubt it). :???: The kitty says: "Oy, just look at the pavement! There, a handsome guy is walking... with a gorgeous feline!" ...I find it funny because i can imagine how hard to drive it has to be, when such a big kitty is hanging on the steering wheel.😁 When my dad was driving us to the country, Kuzya used to hang on dad's head and neck, not letting him drive. Once, we nearly hit the fence, when my granny Nina started trying to take Kuzya away: he got scared and only dug his claws deeper into Buchka's neck (luckily it was our neighbour's fence, and it happened when we were moving very slowly, but, anyway, Buchka managed to stop the car, and it was good - not to crash anything).
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This is the kitty of Liza's friend, Dasha de Conceição (he's sitting on the porch). He's a Turkish angora, and he has different eyes: one blue and one yellow.
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Andy_T

Addicted Poster
Forum Moderator
My poor kitty ... she is getting harassed by wild animals ...

I am aware that - especially in rural environments (not that I would live in such) - cats can be under danger from wild animals, be they lynxes, coyotes, foxes or even minks and similar. But ... songbirds? Seriously???

So ... what happened?

Yesterday when I came home, I let my cat into the garden as usual.
A few minutes later, I became aware of a lout commotion outside, some birds were raising quite a racket.
Shocked, I though "I hope my cat is not trying to catch the birds" and went outside to check. What I saw was very different - my cat was already lying by the side of the terrace door and came inside immediately. Two small birds - I think they are thrushes, as they are not big enough to be blackbirds and brown, not black - were jumping up and down at our garden furniture and trying to come closer.

I was surprised, but did not think much about it. 20 minutes later, my cat again signaled that she wanted to go outside - but she did not completely go outside, but rather remain within the terrace door and just look outside. Immediately, the two birds were coming closer again and increasing the level of their noise. When I stepped outside, they increased the distance, but as soon as I went inside the house again, they again came closer and closer until the point where I was afraid they would come into our living room. At that time, my cat abandoned her place just inside the terrace door and went to lie on the couch, in safe distance from the door.
And while our cat normally at this time of the year loves to spend the whole day outside, just lying on the floor under the garden table or walking around next to our garden, she did not want to go out again yesterday evening until it was very dark and the birds presumably asleep.

In the morning, the procedure was similar.

Normally, my cat wakes me up around 4:30 by softly touching my face with her paws (claws half extended for better reaction), I let her out and go back to bed. Once we all get up around 6:00 a.m., she comes back from her morning patrol.

This morning, she again woke me up around 4:30, I fed her and let her out, but opened my bedroom window at the same time to become aware should anything untoward happen outside. And, of course, 5 minutes later, the birds' clamoring outside started again. I debated with myself what to do, but of course my curiosity and my concern for my poor kitty won out, so I got up again and went out. As soon as my cat saw me, she was visibly delighted, ran towards me, snuggled to my leg and came inside into the safe house with me again. At 4:45, she was again fast asleep on my bed.

So ... on one hand, I am, of course, happy that my kitty does not seem to pose a danger to the local birds, on the other hand I find it a bit unfair that a fierce predator (which is certainly the way my cat sees herself) would be so intimidated by her intended prey that she is afraid to leave the house again.


Predator and prey ... however with reversed roles ...

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Maintaining a safe distance ...

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Val

Extraterrestrial
My poor kitty ... she is getting harassed by wild animals ...

I am aware that - especially in rural environments (not that I would live in such) - cats can be under danger from wild animals, be they lynxes, coyotes, foxes or even minks and similar. But ... songbirds? Seriously???

So ... what happened?

Yesterday when I came home, I let my cat into the garden as usual.
A few minutes later, I became aware of a lout commotion outside, some birds were raising quite a racket.
Shocked, I though "I hope my cat is not trying to catch the birds" and went outside to check. What I saw was very different - my cat was already lying by the side of the terrace door and came inside immediately. Two small birds - I think they are thrushes, as they are not big enough to be blackbirds and brown, not black - were jumping up and down at our garden furniture and trying to come closer.

I was surprised, but did not think much about it. 20 minutes later, my cat again signaled that she wanted to go outside - but she did not completely go outside, but rather remain within the terrace door and just look outside. Immediately, the two birds were coming closer again and increasing the level of their noise. When I stepped outside, they increased the distance, but as soon as I went inside the house again, they again came closer and closer until the point where I was afraid they would come into our living room. At that time, my cat abandoned her place just inside the terrace door and went to lie on the couch, in safe distance from the door.
And while our cat normally at this time of the year loves to spend the whole day outside, just lying on the floor under the garden table or walking around next to our garden, she did not want to go out again yesterday evening until it was very dark and the birds presumably asleep.

In the morning, the procedure was similar.

Normally, my cat wakes me up around 4:30 by softly touching my face with her paws (claws half extended for better reaction), I let her out and go back to bed. Once we all get up around 6:00 a.m., she comes back from her morning patrol.

This morning, she again woke me up around 4:30, I fed her and let her out, but opened my bedroom window at the same time to become aware should anything untoward happen outside. And, of course, 5 minutes later, the birds' clamoring outside started again. I debated with myself what to do, but of course my curiosity and my concern for my poor kitty won out, so I got up again and went out. As soon as my cat saw me, she was visibly delighted, ran towards me, snuggled to my leg and came inside into the safe house with me again. At 4:45, she was again fast asleep on my bed.

So ... on one hand, I am, of course, happy that my kitty does not seem to pose a danger to the local birds, on the other hand I find it a bit unfair that a fierce predator (which is certainly the way my cat sees herself) would be so intimidated by her intended prey that she is afraid to leave the house again.


Predator and prey ... however with reversed roles ...

View attachment 17441

Maintaining a safe distance ...

View attachment 17442
Could it be, that your kitty has somehow (by accident) intervened into their nesting area, so now they think that she poses a threat to them, and they're trying to be defensive "just in case"? (Fierce crows in our town can do that: once i was walking by the bus stop, not far from the high birches, on which plenty of crows' nests are located (on the level of 9th floor). One huge crow flew over my head, and dabbed me into the occiput with her beak! I was lucky that it (the crow) wasn't contagious.
 

Andy_T

Addicted Poster
Forum Moderator
Oh indeed, we are pretty sure that they do have a nest somewhere in our garden, and likely they will consider any cat a threat, simply based on her species.

We have a neighbour's cat, a huge black-and-white tomcat (who has also terrorized our kitty in the past) who I once observed taking one of these birds in our garden.
It happened so fast, I could not do anything, one minute I was watching the birds flying around at a low level, then I just saw the cat darting across the meadow, jumping and grabbing one of the birds out of the air, I was not even aware he was in our garden.

I remember that the other bird(s) then tried to distract the evil bully cat by jumping around him in a short distance, but I don't know if the bird that was grabbed managed to get away.

So obviously the bad behaviour of that bully cat is also expected from our dear kitty, simply because she happens to be a cat, and the birds do not give her any benefit of doubt...
 
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