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Literature The British English vs American English thread!

Joe

Celebrity Member
No, it’s a real custom. It’s most common among the peoples of Eastern Europe. In fact, the following Wikipedia article references its use in Game of Thrones. George RR Martin clearly borrowed it from actual tradition.

Bread and salt - Wikipedia

“Eat Bread and Salt and Speak the Truth” - Russian proverb
Thank you, Amy. Very informative! :)
 

Joe

Celebrity Member
I was watching an old episode of Sherlock. John Watson and a colleague go on a date, then go back to her place. It is late so she goes to bed, while Watson sleeps on her couch. When they wake up the next morning, John is rubbing his shoulder and doing other things that show that the couch wasn't very comfortable.

"Next time I'll let you kip at the foot of my bed," she says.

I don't believe we have the word kip (sleep) in American English.
 

Joe

Celebrity Member
I recently saw the British comedy, Their Finest, which is set in WWII. One of the men in the film is enamored of one of the women, and he keeps saying things like "you're the mustard." This appears to be slang for "you're the greatest." But I was unable to find mustard used in this sense in any dictionary. Also, I am wondering whether this is still in use or whether it was just used during the WWII era.
 

Joe

Celebrity Member
In an article on Brexit from the BBC website, the author wrote:

But is this a giant two fingers to Theresa May's entire approach that really changes things for the negotiations?
A conversation to be had over Brexit

What does this expression mean? I take it the "two fingers" gesture is some sort of insult, but we don't seem to have anything similar in American English.

British A sign made with the first two fingers pointing up in a V-shape, with the back of the hand facing outward, used as a gesture of abuse or contempt
.

V-sign | Definition of V-sign in US English by Oxford Dictionaries

Oxford Dictionary said "two fingers" equals V-sign in the sense quoted above.
 
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Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
In an article on Brexit from the BBC website, the author wrote:



A conversation to be had over Brexit

What does this expression mean? I take it the "two fingers" gesture is some sort of insult, but we don't seem to have anything similar in American English.

.

V-sign | Definition of V-sign in US English by Oxford Dictionaries

Oxford Dictionary said "two fingers" equals V-sign in the sense quoted above.
The topic has come up before in this thread (see here), but as for the literal meaning, and I apologize in advance for the rude language, I can only guess that it means something like "stick these fingers up your arse". I base that assumption partly on the phrase often accompanying the gesture: "up yours".

See also the Wiki page about the V sign as an insult.
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
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