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Programming languages

What is your favourite programming language?


  • Total voters
    12

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
This thread is to argue why your favourite programming language is particularly awesome.

I would argue that Python is an amazing language for the following reasons:
  • Easy to get started with. It doesn't have a complicated environment setup/installation procedure since pre-compiled packages exist for a vast number of OSes, and even if you have to compile it, it's pretty straightforward at least on UNIX-style OSes. And once you start writing code, no complicated pre-compilation of the code is needed.
  • Easy to learn as there is lots of easy-to-navigate and up-to-date documentation.
  • Helpful stacktraces when something goes wrong.
  • Fast (for a scripting language)
  • Relatively large standard library of modules that comes with every installation
  • Versatile - can be used with other languages such as Java or C/C++. It's often used as the "glue" between programs written in C/C++, Fortran etc when setting up pipelines of software. This is possibly one of the reasons why it's popular in scientific computing.
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
I would vote, but all I know is HTML. I'm old school (where old school is a euphemism for incompetent).
Ah, good old HTML! Although it's "just" a markup language, there are lots of things you can do, especially when coupled with CSS, and Javascript. And I understand that HTML5 is supposed to be pretty awesome with its direct support for video, canvas, scalable vector graphics, etc.
 

Mel

Coffee, black!
Location
NB, Canada
I say VB, because that is the one I am most familiar with. I worked mainly with VB.Net in college, and C++, and a bit of Java. I did a Cobol class (we were the last class to have it available to us), which I didn't really care for, and lots of SQL. Of course, we got a basic HTML course, but I was already familiar with that at that point.
 

Lord Snot

Parsley Provider
Ah, good old HTML! Although it's "just" a markup language, there are lots of things you can do, especially when coupled with CSS, and Javascript. And I understand that HTML5 is supposed to be pretty awesome with its direct support for video, canvas, scalable vector graphics, etc.
I find it does everything I want to for content. I do the content for my work's e-mail address but the IT department control the design and I don't have permissions to change certain things. It's really frustrating trying to get them to do anything (think an office full of Michaels) but that's another thread :p
 

beanstew

Certified horsemeat free.
I use Perl for most things mostly out of familiarity. It has most of the advantages IS mentions for Python although a lot of the heavily idiomatic code used by experienced programmers can be confusing to beginners.

I have been meaning to have a good look at Erlang for a while as it looks very interesting but it is very different from Perl and other C style languages so I haven't really got my head around it yet.
 

schmencer

banana hater
Location
Michigan
I voted for and like java, but mainly because it's what I have the most experience with (in my limited time coding). The coolest language I've worked with, though, is SML (standard ml). I love the elegance of functional programming.
 

sleepydvdr

Veteran Member
I'm not a programmer. I have dabbled with AutoIt and found it to be the easiest and most understandable language of all. For beginners, it's really easy to get started and make stuff that works.
 

SummerRain

I dreamed that God would be forgiving.
Location
UK
I've only ever used C++ / C and so far that's only one uni module, but I'm hoping to do some more over the summer and next year. :)
 

nigel

Veteran Member
Location
France
This thread is to argue why your favourite programming language is particularly awesome.

I would argue that Python is an amazing language for the following reasons:
  • Easy to get started with. It doesn't have a complicated environment setup/installation procedure since pre-compiled packages exist for a vast number of OSes, and even if you have to compile it, it's pretty straightforward at least on UNIX-style OSes. And once you start writing code, no complicated pre-compilation of the code is needed.
  • Easy to learn as there is lots of easy-to-navigate and up-to-date documentation.
  • Helpful stacktraces when something goes wrong.
  • Fast (for a scripting language)
  • Relatively large standard library of modules that comes with every installation
  • Versatile - can be used with other languages such as Java or C/C++. It's often used as the "glue" between programs written in C/C++, Fortran etc when setting up pipelines of software. This is possibly one of the reasons why it's popular in scientific computing.
I'm a hardcore old-school C programmer, but most of the programming I do now is for GIS and ESRI products are becoming harder to use flexibly with any languages other than Python. The work I do is often heavy on recursion. Is overflow much of an issue? Can you control stack size limits?
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
I'm a hardcore old-school C programmer, but most of the programming I do now is for GIS and ESRI products are becoming harder to use flexibly with any languages other than Python. The work I do is often heavy on recursion. Is overflow much of an issue? Can you control stack size limits?
Cool ... I've never had to modify the stack size, but it seems it's possible:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5061582/setting-stacksize-in-a-python-script

You might also be interested in this:
sys.setrecursionlimit(limit)
Set the maximum depth of the Python interpreter stack to limit. This limit prevents infinite recursion from causing an overflow of the C stack and crashing Python.

The highest possible limit is platform-dependent. A user may need to set the limit higher when she has a program that requires deep recursion and a platform that supports a higher limit. This should be done with care, because a too-high limit can lead to a crash.
http://docs.python.org/library/sys.html#sys.setrecursionlimit
 

~Wonder

Star Member
JavaScript. I'm not sure why you didn't list it as an option, but it is by far my favorite programming language. Then followed by PHP.
 

Dave in MPLS

Not an actual rooster
Motorola 68000 CPU family assembly language for me
6502 assembly was my 2nd language. I picked it up in the mid-80s.

You know, folks that know assembly (for any processor) are a rarity nowadays ...
 

beanstew

Certified horsemeat free.
I did some 68k assembly at university. We used these little target boards with lights, switches and motors on and wrote level crossing and washing machine simulations and other similar things.

I play around a bit now with Atmel AVRs but am currently only as far as blinking LEDs and sending messages over the UART to an attached PC. It's fun!
 
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