• Curious about veganism or vegetarianism? Why not ask us a question? (You don't have to sign up, or be vegan or vegetarian!)

UK New pets for old people?

Peter

Famous Member
Location
UK or Spain
I bought two wonderful 4 month old beagles last year and am concerned that they should have a good home if I and my partner should pass to a higher state of perfection before they go. My sons would probably be happy to adopt but I would not want to make them feel obliged to do this. I have discussed this with my older son and he is sure that dogs are perfectly happy to find a new home if circumstances make this necessary. Today I saw an advert from the RSPCA on TV for a scheme called "Home for Life" which offers exactly this service: How Home for Life works - RSPCA . A similar scheme run by PAD exists in Mijas Costa in Spain too.My sister adopted one of their dogs.
Death can come to us at any age. My niece died at age 36 whilst her mother outlived her and died 2 years ago, aged 91. The 2 schemes I mentioned offer a very good service. I would be interested in your views.
Happy new Year!
Peter
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I have seen the RSPCA ad on the TV and it does seem like an appealing idea. It would be very careless to have for a pet and not have a plan to re home it in the event of death or a serious illness.

I was also wondering how much the HFL plan costs.

I wouldn't always count on children and good friends to take care of a pet when you're no longer here. Perhaps, they may think they could do so, but it is a big responsibility and long term commitment. Many people do not put enough thought into it before committing.

I have a friend who is 75 and has two young dogs. She is actually very worried about their future in the event of her dying. She has asked her daughter to take care of them whilst she finds decent homes for them. Nevertheless it is a source of concern for her.
 

Peter

Famous Member
Location
UK or Spain
I have seen the RSPCA ad on the TV and it does seem like an appealing idea. It would be very careless to have for a pet and not have a plan to re home it in the event of death or a serious illness.

I was also wondering how much the HFL plan costs.
I wouldn't always count on children and good friends to take care of a pet when you're no longer here. Perhaps, they may think they could do so, but it is a big responsibility and long term commitment. Many people do not put enough thought into it before committing.
I have a friend who is 75 and has two young dogs. She is actually very worried about their future in the event of her dying. She has asked her daughter to take care of them whilst she finds decent homes for them. Nevertheless it is a source of concern for her.
HFL is free! But they ask you to consider making a donation in your will.
I would not ask my grandchildren to look after my dogs but my sons are old enough. My older son lives in the Peak District and loves dogs. He loves the Beatles too and his motto is "All you need is love...and a dog."
I think young people should also take advantage of this offer. They too may well die or become unemployed during the lifetime of the pet/s. Unfortunately some young people take on the responsibility of having a dog while they are still working and then leave the poor animal/s for 10 hours or more a day alone. Several of my neighbours in Spain do this and the dogs sometimes bark all day long. There are many situations in life in which it is not advisable to buy a pet. Hence the many dogs which are abandoned soon after Christmas. Older people are usually more considerate and thoughtful.
I don't think your friend need worry too much. Dogs and even children are very adaptable if placed in a good home.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
HFL is free! But they ask you to consider making a donation in your will.
I would not ask my grandchildren to look after my dogs but my sons are old enough. My older son lives in the Peak District and loves dogs. He loves the Beatles too and his motto is "All you need is love...and a dog."
I think young people should also take advantage of this offer. They too may well die or become unemployed during the lifetime of the pet/s. Unfortunately some young people take on the responsibility of having a dog while they are still working and then leave the poor animal/s for 10 hours or more a day alone. Several of my neighbours in Spain do this and the dogs sometimes bark all day long. There are many situations in life in which it is not advisable to buy a pet. Hence the many dogs which are abandoned soon after Christmas. Older people are usually more considerate and thoughtful.
I don't think your friend need worry too much. Dogs and even children are very adaptable if placed in a good home.
That is amazing that the HFL is a free service. I certainly hope that people would consider leaving money to the RSPCA if they wish on using the plan.
My friend isn't worried about her King Charles C as she is a doll and would certainly like anyone who would offer her a home. It's her little guy, a chihuahua, who was already abandoned by his former owner. His brother was adopted by another family and since he's been living with my friend, he has become very frightened of others. He only wants to be with her and is very demanding.

It is a shame that many dogs are left alone during the day. I was also working full time when I had my baby girl so she slept a lot during the day . On the other hand, she was far happier with me then in her former home. Now that I've retired, I really cannot commit to having a pet for financial reasons.
Thankfully, we have organisations such as the RSPCA and the Dogs Trust who help all these innocent abandoned animals.:yes:

You can also donate to the RSPCA if you subscribe to Give as You Live.com. You choose your favourite on line stores and when you make certain purchases, a % is donated to the charity.
 
Last edited:

Tom

Addicted Poster
Location
Upstate New York
@Peter , you make an interesting point which I hadn't thought of: younger people are less likely to pre-decease their pets... BUT... older people, assuming they're retired, can send more time with their animals. My cats and rabbits got lots of time with me on weekends, and when I got home on weekdays. Still, it would have been nice to be able to spend even more time with them. They always seemed to be glad when I got home after a workday.
 

Peter

Famous Member
Location
UK or Spain
@Peter , you make an interesting point which I hadn't thought of: younger people are less likely to pre-decease their pets... BUT... older people, assuming they're retired, can send more time with their animals. My cats and rabbits got lots of time with me on weekends, and when I got home on weekdays. Still, it would have been nice to be able to spend even more time with them. They always seemed to be glad when I got home after a workday.
Younger people are often very focused on their careers and their social life. Making new friends is also time consuming and isn't always compatible with spending time with pets -wining and dining, pubbing and clubbing etc. Older people have been there and done all that and enjoy the rhythm of the normal, everyday routine, weekends and holidays in the countryside etc., all the things we couldn't do as easily when we had a career.
 
Top