• Curious about veganism or vegetarianism? Why not ask us a question? (You don't have to sign up, or be vegan or vegetarian!)

Vegan Mushroom Cardamom & Squash Soup

Trinity

YES!
Here in Glastonbury, England the autumn chill has well and truly started, so I'm beginning to enjoy some hearty, nurturing dishes whilst snuggled around my open fire. The recipe I am sharing in this article is a gorgeous warming soup that uses squash as the base. The inviting fragrance of cardamom, warming hint of ginger, earthy mushrooms, tomato, coconut and fresh herbs weave together to create a delightfully pleasing soup. I use the seeds from the cardamom pods, which imbue a richer, more aromatic flavour than it's pre-ground version. Cardamom and ginger (like many quality herbs and spices) unleash a myriad of health benefits. As hypocrates once said 'Let food be thy medicine'.

You can use any sort of mushrooms for this recipe, although I prefer flavourful ones like chestnut or even shiitake.



Serves: 2 hearty bowls
Cooking & preparation: 30 minutes

Ingredients:
  • 350g of peeled squash (equivalent to about 2½ cups when the squash is cubed)
  • 300 - 400ml (1¼ to 1¾ cups) water (depending on preferrence)
  • 125ml coconut cream (5 tablespoons)
  • 1 heaped teaspoon ginger (freshly grated)
  • 4 cardamom pods
  • 1 teaspoon celtic sea salt
  • 250ml (1 cup) passata (also known as strained or sieved tomatoes)
  • 1 medium sized leek
  • 200g (couple of large handfuls) mushrooms
  • Dash of coconut oil
  • A handful of fresh herbs (either parsley or basil)
You will need two pans for this recipe. It is simple to make, created in two parts that are combined together to create one delicious soup. The first part involves creating a squash sauce/soup base. While that is cooking, you will need to sauteé the leek and mushrooms separately.

Creating the squash soup base:


  1. Peel and dice approximately 350g of squash. Chopping into cubes (under an inch cubed in size will work fine).
  2. Open your cardamom pods and take out the seeds. Finely chop these seeds with a sharp knife by going over and over them again and scraping your tiny pile back to centre a few times; until the seeds seem well chopped (as best you can anyway).
  3. Peel and finely grate 1 heaped teaspoon worth of fresh ginger.
  4. Add all the cardamom and ginger to your squash pan with the water, coconut cream, passata and sea salt. Bring to the boil and then allow to simmer for at least 15 minutes (or until the squash is soft enough to easily pierce with a fork).
  5. Blend until smooth, right there in the pan with a hand blender (immersion blender) if you have one; or blend in a jug blender.
Cooking the leek and mushrooms:

  1. Whilst you are waiting for the squash to cook... Melt a dash of coconut oil in a pan, turn on the heat.
  2. Roughly chop your mushrooms and chop leeks quite small.
  3. Add to the pan and gently sauteé for a few minutes until soft.
Bringing it all together:
  1. Add the mushroom and leek into the main squash base and gently mix in along with a generous handful of fresh basil or parsley.
  2. Serve with fresh healthy bread!

Enjoy!

Trinity
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Trinity

YES!
This sounds like it would be pretty delicious....I think I will try but perhaps without the coconut.
It may well turn out fine if you leave out the coconut, although it will likely have a different effect, since the coconut is a pretty important part to this recipe. Have fun :)
 

flyingsnail

Well Known Member
It may well turn out fine if you leave out the coconut, although it will likely have a different effect, since the coconut is a pretty important part to this recipe. Have fun :)
I try to avoid rich sources of saturated fat but I'll probably try it first with the coconut cream.....5 tablespoons isn't that much for two big bowls.

Out of curiosity, if you were to add a legume to this recipe which would you pick?
 
Last edited:

Trinity

YES!
I try to avoid rich sources of saturated fat but I'll probably try it first with the coconut cream.....5 tablespoons isn't that much for two big bowls.
I do believe that saturated plant fat is very different to saturated animal fat. So, whilst I am really into health and wellness I am happy to use coconut in my recipes. Although, of course, you have to do what feels right for you ;)
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I do believe that saturated plant fat is very different to saturated animal fat. So, whilst I am really into health and wellness I am happy to use coconut in my recipes. Although, of course, you have to do what feels right for you ;)
That is also what I would say. I get inspiration from recipes and hardly ever follow the exact list of ingredients. You can also substitute the coconut cream with either Oatly cream, a few spoons of evo or just omit it.
 

flyingsnail

Well Known Member
I do believe that saturated plant fat is very different to saturated animal fat. So, whilst I am really into health and wellness I am happy to use coconut in my recipes. Although, of course, you have to do what feels right for you ;)
Plant based saturated fat is higher in medium chain fatty acids which may be a bit better for you than the longer chains that tend to dominate animal based saturated fat but plant based saturated fat is still worse for you than the "good fats" (e.g., plant based unsaturated fat).

I'll use coconut milk/cream at times for its unique flavor despite the saturated fat but never use coconut oil since you can always use olive, canola, etc instead.

I still need to try this recipe, have been so busy the last couple of months.
 

Mikkel

Addicted Poster
It looks so delicios, so I want to try this one one day!

So a couple of really stupid question from Norway now @Trinity

But the squash. I asume it's not the green one I'm used to call squash here? So what kind do you use?

And can I replace the cardamom pods with ground cardamom? And how much do you think? I don't think I've ever seen cardamom pods in Norway. Not even on the ethnical stores.
 

Trinity

YES!
No no - not stupid questions at all Mikkel. These things vary so much from nation to nation.

You can try most sorts of squash. Butternut works well. Pumpkin would also be fine. You sure can replace the cardamom pods for ground cardamom. My friends have to do this too. It still tastes really good (but if you can get the pods, then it sends it to a whole new level of incredible-ness!). I worked out the coversion (but can't remember off the top of my head)... basicially the pre-ground stuff loses it's potency, so you usually need more. I would put a teaspoon in and add a little more if needed.

Good luck :)
 
Top