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Psychology Is summer the season for madness?

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
This was just an unfounded hypothesis I have.

No, says this Dutch study:
"The authors conclude that there are only limited seasonal variations in mental disorders in general population studies, at least in countries with a mild maritime climate."

Still, it seems that homicide rates are higher in the warmer months. (See e.g. this NY Times article.) And suicide rates are higher in spring and early summer, apparently. Of course, you don't necessarily have to be "mad" to kill someone or commit suicide, so not sure if homicide and suicide rates can be used as arguments in the "madness" discussion ...?

Thoughts?
 

Poppy

Ankle Biter
I don't know. If I were going to shoot someone I'd probably choose spring or fall, as the weather would be more conducive to making a quick get-away.

Kidding aside, my sanity always feels a bit fragile in the depths of winter - January, February, March. And although I try to find the "hygge" in winter hunkering down, it does seem to be a very long stretch of cold and grey. And I'm typically less active because of the weather. So I try to give myself ease during those months, and if I feel a little crazy, I just try to roll with it.
 

Amy SF

Dweller in nature
It's possible that we notice more "mad" activity in the warmer months because people are more likely to go outside. During the cold months, people stay indoors more often, which leads to these people going stir-crazy. So when the weather warms up, they leave the house. They've been stuck at home, they've experienced Seasonal Affective Disorder, they're in a fragile state, physically, emotionally, mentally, and anything can set them off.

That's my totally unscientific theory. :p
 

Mischief

Stranger in a strange land
The heat and humidity in many parts of the U.S. during the summer tends to make people irritable, and I think that people also tend to drink more, which would lead to more fights and emotion driven homicides. There are always especially high incidences of trouble during periods of heat waves.

I'm not surprised at higher suicide rates in the spring. I've often thought that Eliot had it right, "April is the cruelest month...." If you're prone to depression, you kind of figure that winter will be tough, but then, when everything stirs to life and becomes beautiful again, and you still feel like shit, it really hits home that this is not something that's going to pass....
 
M

Moll Flanders

Guest
I know that some people with seasonal depression do struggle to get the energy to commit suicide in the winter months but that spring perks them up and they have the energy to go through with the act.

Of course, you don't necessarily have to be "mad" to kill someone or commit suicide
Well, obviously.o_O "Mad" isn't used as a clinical term usually, well not in my country anyway. It's a very ignorant and old fashioned term.
 
I know that some people with seasonal depression do struggle to get the energy to commit suicide in the winter months but that spring perks them up and they have the energy to go through with the act.



Well, obviously.o_O "Mad" isn't used as a clinical term usually, well not in my country anyway. It's a very ignorant and old fashioned term.
Mad means angry for the most part here.
 

Tom

Addicted Poster
Location
Upstate New York
I recall hearing/reading that violent crime tends to go up during the summer, but that certain types of depression are more prevalent during winter. I love the warm weather, myself. But I'm not sure if it's about being able to really enjoy myself outside, the long days, or something else.
 
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