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Indian Curries

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
Living - A Guide to Indian Curries.

There is a lot of confusion between the different types of Indian curries. The actual word curry means a
dish cooked in a sauce made with strong spices.

My favourite curry is Madras. It's full of flavours and is quite spicy. My second favourite is Rogan Josh which is far milder.
 

Poppy

Ankle Biter
I like Kormas, Masalas and Biryani (which I wouldn't have thought to be a curry). Around here, you can get them all made vegan at a few places.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I like Kormas, Masalas and Biryani (which I wouldn't have thought to be a curry). Around here, you can get them all made vegan at a few places.
Korma is delicious. It has a beautiful creamy texture and the spices are less overpowering.
 

Peter

Famous Member
For me a big advantage with curries is that you can cook the whole dish in just one pan. The word "curry" covers a multitude of sins. I've had good ones and bad ones. I like to keep it simple and nearly always make the same curry, a sort of vegan Anglo-Indian dish. I also prefer the little jars of curry powder that many supermarkets sell: they always work out better than when I try to mix my own spices. I never buy the large jars of curry sauce, they have too may ingredients with e numbers. Apart from salads, curry is probably the dish I eat most.
 

Andy_T

Addicted Poster
Forum Moderator
Great idea, allow me to add more geographic variety ...

The Ultimate Guide to Thai Curries + Learn How to Make a Curry Paste

I have those in my pantry, they make preparing a curry dish really easy.

curry2.jpg


And, finally, there is also Japanese curry ... typically much milder than most of the others.

Japanese Curry: 10 Ways to Savor This Spicy Sensation

japanese curry.jpg


I LOVE Japanese Curry places, as they are typically non-vegan places in malls or similar that offer little for vegans where you can get a really nice accidentally vegan meal by customizing your order with the available vegan options.
 
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shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I love Masalas, and I'm huge fan of Thai curries.
I find that Thai style curries are so different compared to the Indian ones.

When I have a curry craving it has to be the Indian style. I suppose that it brings back childhood memories. My mum made the best curry ever.:up:
 

Frederic Lavender

Well Known Member
When I think of curries I automatically think Indian curry! So I loove curry and found that most Indian curries are actually vegan. Like potato curry, aubergine curry, I use to love paneer curry before transitioning but use firm tofu as a replacement and tastes almost the same :)
 

Freesia

not my business.
For me a big advantage with curries is that you can cook the whole dish in just one pan. The word "curry" covers a multitude of sins. I've had good ones and bad ones. I like to keep it simple and nearly always make the same curry, a sort of vegan Anglo-Indian dish. I also prefer the little jars of curry powder that many supermarkets sell: they always work out better than when I try to mix my own spices. I never buy the large jars of curry sauce, they have too may ingredients with e numbers. Apart from salads, curry is probably the dish I eat most.
How cool, I am Anglo Indian.. I wouldnt mind hearing more about the dish :) ...
 

Freesia

not my business.
I really like "Butter chicken", that is perhaps one of my favourites, though it is more of an "accessory" curry.. have plans to make a vegan version one day..

In general I like a wide range of Indian curries.. not really fussy, as long as isnt too hot.. I also like Thai curries a lot.. Japanese curries good too... cant really go wrong..
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
When I think of curries I automatically think Indian curry! So I loove curry and found that most Indian curries are actually vegan. Like potato curry, aubergine curry, I use to love paneer curry before transitioning but use firm tofu as a replacement and tastes almost the same :)
Most vegetables pair really well with the pungent taste of curry spices. My favourites ones are ; pumpkin and chickpea,
sweet potato and spinach, cauliflower and sweet potato. I think that aubergines would make a delicious curry as they'd soak up all the juices and flavours.
However, I absolutely loathe potato curry or any other dish which involves potatoes cooked in a sauce/stew. I once had a vegetable/potato curry in an Indian restaurant in the UK and it tasted awful. Moreover, they served it with sweet coconut rice - not nice !!!;)

Brits love their curry and I think that it's the most popular dish in the UK. :)
 
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shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I love Korma... it is one of the things I often get if I am out and there is a curry stand at a food court.. maybe will get some next week.. :)
I've always thought of Korma being the most decadent of curries, due to it's creaminess. ;)
 
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Frederic Lavender

Well Known Member
Most vegetables pair really well with the pungent taste of curry spices. My favourites ones are ; pumpkin and chickpea,
sweet potato and spinach, cauliflower and sweet potato. I think that aubergines would make a delicious curry as they'd soak up all the juices and flavours.
However, I absolutely loathe potato curry or any other dish which envolves potatoes cooked in a sauce/stew. I once had a vegetable/potato curry in an Indian restaurant in the UK and it tasted awful. Moreover, they served it with sweet coconut rice - not nice !!!;)

Brits love their curry and I think that it's the most popular dish in the UK. :)
Sorry to hear of your bad experience in curries! Generally if you go to places in London, Leicester and Birmingham, you can't go wrong as they are so diverse in cultures.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
Sorry to hear of your bad experience in curries! Generally if you go to places in London, Leicester and Birmingham, you can't go wrong as they are so diverse in cultures.
The restaurant was in a small market town but was very popular with the locals. As all the other customers were ordering omni curries. I gathered that they had just thrown in a few beans, carrots and spuds to come up with their vegan curry.:rolleyes:
I'm virtually certain that they didn't make a separate sauce and just ladled it onto the vegetables. I've met a few people who have worked in restaurants and apparently it's better not to see what goes on behind the scenes.:(

Moreover, when I asked whether they had brown rice, the waiter raised his eyebrows ! I thought ''I'm in trouble here and making myself noticed''. :p

I was in Leicester during my Summer holidays this year and it was my cousin who made some amazing curry style dishes. They tasted far better than anything I've ever had in a restaurant. I actually prefer home made curries to the restaurant ones.
 

Frederic Lavender

Well Known Member
The restaurant was in a small market town but was very popular with the locals. As all the other customers were ordering omni curries. I gathered that they had just thrown in a few beans, carrots and spuds to come up with their vegan curry.:rolleyes:
I'm virtually certain that they didn't make a separate sauce and just ladled it onto the vegetables. I've met a few people who have worked in restaurants and apparently it's better not to see what goes on behind the scenes.:(

Moreover, when I asked whether they had brown rice, the waiter raised his eyebrows ! I thought ''I'm in trouble here and making myself noticed''. :p

I was in Leicester during my Summer holidays this year and it was my cousin who made some amazing curry style dishes. They tasted far better than anything I've ever had in a restaurant. I actually prefer home made curries to the restaurant ones.
I think the market town was a place called Market Harborough (probably not the best for curries :p)
Nothing beats a homemade curry for sure, especially if it is mama's recipe
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I think the market town was a place called Market Harborough (probably not the best for curries :p)
Nothing beats a homemade curry for sure, especially if it is mama's recipe
No, but it wasn't too far from MH. That town has the most amazing (food ) shopping centre that I've ever seen. You have all the major supermarkets side by side, i.e. Sainsbury's, Waitrose and Aldi. That would suit me as I always shop in all of these stores and it's a bit time consuming. Well, that is a fib as I LOVE the UK supermarkets. ;)

MH also has an amazing wholesale store for home/kitchen goods for a fraction of the price compared to regular shops.

About Jones Wholesale

We are very off topic……..;)
 
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shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I like the spices in it, somehow salty but also cardamon, cinnamon.. hard to explain... i find it hard to recreate when cooking..
This is the problem when you want to recreate an authentic curry as perhaps the one eaten isn't the real thing. Moreover, curries have various spices that are difficult to find if you don't live in India.

I recall the korma that I had in a restaurant was rich, creamy quite salty and mild. I would imagine that it was made with cashews, curry leaves and cardamon. It really was perfect. :yes:

The balance of spices was just right.This is also when many people make the mistake by not getting really knowing
how to mix the spices or get the quantity right.

Korma Sauce
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
So what do you like as an accompaniment/side dish with a curry ? I think that it's actually just as important as the main dish. I always serve it with brown rice (no other grain will do) plus sliced bananas. During the summer months I also like a glass of chilled shandy to go with it. Alcohol and spices don't pair too well.

I have had naan bread and really found that it paired well.The main drawback is that we shops don't stock it over here.

Some people will have chutney and others enjoy a cool cucumber/yogurt salad to kill the fiery taste. Others drink a cool mint lassi with curry.

The best side dishes to serve with a curry
 
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