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NZ If you are thinking of travelling DU(New Zealand) some speech hints .

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
The "r" and the vowels, except "o", are the same as in Norwegian.

Unlike some other countries colonised by Europeans, it seems like in NZ they manage to integrate better and keep more harmonious relations with the indigenous people. I'm sure it's not perfect, but it seems much better than say, Australia, for example.
 

blues

World Class Member
Aha...💓 I frequently hear these names on the radio (the sound "R" is very close to russian "R", and most of other sounds have much in common with russian analogs). I also learned a new word (i hear it every day, lol): Tamariki (+ Oranga Tamariki).🐣
That's interesting about the commonality with Russian Val . As for Oranga Tamariki (Ministry of Children) ,I think it might be in the news for some time longer .
 
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Val

Extraterrestrial
That's interesting about the commonality with Russian.
Ugu, most of vowels and consonants in Māori te reo are somewhat similar to Russian, though in different parts of Russian Federation, or even in different corners of federal subjects (oblasti) it may vary tremendously. (But, anyway, Māori sounds are closer to Russian sounds, than English language in general, for instance. Most sounds in English have nothing in common with russian sounds).
But... nevertheless... it seems to me, last summer, i was telling someone about some common features of Petersburgian accent (spoken in SPb and suburbs) and English, spoken in NZ. I obviously speak Petersburgian too, and most people, who are not from here, notice that i have a distinct Petersburgian accent. Based on what i've heard from NZ radio stations, i may say (i may be mistaken, but it looks like this, from a perspective of a foreigner), that English spoken in NZ tends to have sound "e" almost (not everywhere, of course, but i can't get what the rules are) replaced by "i" (its degree depends on a narrator!), plus some consonants are sharpened very distinctively. All these things are very very common for Petersburgian accent. ...When i got my first Android and started (immediately) listening to NZ radio stations (many of them even have changed the names and DJs since then),- i couldn't understand a thing. But now, i got used to. Now, i have a lot more difficulties comprehending British accents, that are abundant, which makes it even harder for me. Pretty much the same was happening to me, when i (when i got my first computer) started watching Australian movies. It was difficult and amusing at the same time. I enjoy Australian accent(s), but NZ accent(s) is/are more precious for me (for the reasons i was telling you about earlier). :innocent: :ma:
P.S. Blin! It's complicated. Sorry that i can't explain it properly.:shrug:
 
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blues

World Class Member
Ugu, most of vowels and consonants in Māori te reo are somewhat similar to Russian, though in different parts of Russian Federation, or even in different corners of federal subjects (oblasti) it may vary tremendously. (But, anyway, Māori sounds are closer to Russian sounds, than English language in general, for instance. Most sounds in English have nothing in common with russian sounds).
But... nevertheless... it seems to me, last summer, i was telling someone about some common features of Petersburgian accent (spoken in SPb and suburbs) and English, spoken in NZ. I obviously speak Petersburgian too, and most people, who are not from here, notice that i have a distinct Petersburgian accent. Based on what i've heard from NZ radio stations, i may say (i may be mistaken, but it looks like this, from a perspective of a foreigner), that English spoken in NZ tends to have sound "e" almost (not everywhere, of course, but i can't get what the rules are) replaced by "i" (its degree depends on a narrator!), plus some consonants are sharpened very distinctively. All these things are very very common for Petersburgian accent. ...When i got my first Android and started (immediately) listening to NZ radio stations (many of them even have changed the names and DJs since then),- i couldn't understand a thing. But now, i got used to. Now, i have a lot more difficulties comprehending British accents, that are abundant, which makes it even harder for me. Pretty much the same was happening to me, when i (when i got my first computer) started watching Australian movies. It was difficult and amusing at the same time. I enjoy Australian accent(s), but NZ accent(s) is/are more precious for me (for the reasons i was telling you about earlier). :innocent: :ma:
P.S. Blin! It's complicated. Sorry that i can't explain it properly.:shrug:
Thought you explained it well Val:) , sounds like if I travel to Russia , Petersburg might be the place to go to learn Russian .

When I first traveled overseas a lot of english speakers from other countries had trouble understand me :eek:

Anyway here's a video that explain it easier than me .

 

Val

Extraterrestrial
Thought you explained it well Val:) , sounds like if I travel to Russia , Petersburg might be the place to go to learn Russian .

When I first traveled overseas a lot of english speakers from other countries had trouble understand me :eek:

Anyway here's a video that explain it easier than me .

Thanks! :hug: This guy definitely explains some features. (But there are so much more "hidden rules" that i would like to perceive!) I might sound crazy to you, but, being a total synesthete, i find NZ accent (and Armenian language!!!) to somewhat match my own brain's oscillation. I perceive it as color visualisation. If my brain loves something, it responds with explosions of color (in a special order, of course). I mean, colors are never plain,- they flow and mix up with each other, but any barely visible fluctuations of this flow tell me the new information about the world around me and about my inner condition. Everybody knows, that electromagnetic spectrum includes color constituent. Perception of electromagnetic fields can tell you some useful info about the nearest future, e.g., because past events, present time and future events exist simultaneously, and all events that have happened, are happening right now, or are going to happen, have their own electromagnetic trace in the universum. Your brain just converts this trace's color constituent into "thought forms" and intuition.🌌
 
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blues

World Class Member
Thanks! :hug: This guy definitely explains some features. (But there are so much more "hidden rules" that i would like to perceive!)
Well one of the quirks of our speech is that most kiwis are rather reserved/unpretentious in their speech or communication with others. We are not so much in your face but unfortunately we do go on about some behind their back .

Its very difficult to explain on the net , but we use our body language to express trust ,like, dislike along with or speach or lack of it .

All cultures have their idioms much like you and Amy exchange in regard American and Russian saying .

Ours is a language is riddled with irony . We say "that's a pretty rose" ,that self explanatory, but we also say "I just witnessed a pretty bad fight" .The pretty emphasising how bad the fight was .

Its rather interesting your synesthetes and how it relates to NZ and USA accents and how the colors are converted into thoughts .:)
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
Ours is a language is riddled with irony .
You would be surprised to what degree it relates to Russian language. In most cases, foreigners just can't understand whether we are serious, or are joking. Also, Russian language is full of rhitorical questions (in everyday speech), which are not questions at all, in fact. (I was telling about it previously). Maybe that's the part of "mysterious russian soul"? :lol:
 

blues

World Class Member
I'd love to see it with my own eyes somedays!😏
P.S. We do the same, actually!
Well you never know what the future is Val , we are everywhere, NZs travel everywhere ✈ You will run into some of us someday .:)
 

blues

World Class Member
I really like the NZ accent.:) However, I cannot always tell the difference between an Aussie and a kiwi accent.

That was interesting shyvas., Well we seem to pick the difference o/k and Aussies aren't as reserved as us lot . For some reasons, I seem to have an interest in how accents evolved to what they are . I picked up a British hitchhiker once and he was amazed how we don't have english accents . So the question (not unlike Aussie accents ) How did we evolve speech wise to what have to day .

Except for the bottom of the south island the speech patterns in NZ are fairly consistent .

I noticed immigrants pick up on the accent as well .

In the UK I can understand how the Welsh ,Irish and Scottish languages can override spoken english . But there are parts of the UK where english has always been the spoken language , but even in short distances from each other their accents are different .
 
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