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UK Brexit aftermath/repercussions

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
We tend to say 'England' in Norway as well when what we mean to say if GB or UK. I have the impression that Germans also tend to make the same mistake. So you're not alone there, Val :)
 
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Celibataire

Well Known Member
We're opinionated because this is the most important issue to affect the future of our country since a referendum was allowed in 1975, on what was then the European Economic Community, aka the 'Common Market', which we had joined at the beginning of 1973 without a referendum being allowed; and which British people mostly - misguidedly as it turned out - believed was for the trade in goods and services only.

That it took 41 years to have another referendum, on what had then become the European Union, with no pretension that it was simply about trade, is itself hardly a resounding endorsement of British democracy; and when the very belated vote on membership was allowed it was rejected by a majority of more than a million people.

You see up until three years ago, no British citizen born after 1957 had ever had a vote on the European political project, which as has become more apparent over the years is to create a European Superstate and one run by an unelected commission at that.

As for the English / British thing, as I am both I'm not offended, just pointing out that English citizenship doesn't exist (whilst English national identity obviously does). Scots and Welsh people do not appreciate being labelled as English though, although they are obviously British.
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
We tend to say 'England' in Norway as well when what we mean to say if GB or UK. I have the impression that Germans also tend to make the same mistake. So you're not alone there, Val :)
Thanks! :hug:
P.S. Lol, if anyone called me a "Soviet girl", i would be more than tolerate,- i would say, i even would be proud!
 

Brian

Mad Bard
As a multinational political union at least it has a common language, culture and history which is more than the EU has, ever has had or ever will. Pro-EU 'Remainers' conveniently ignore this.
I don't see why a common culture and history matters unless you are the type of person who insists that only those who are like you should live near you - i.e. a bigot. As for language, I have had no trouble at all getting on with Swedes and people from other european countries living in Sweden by speaking english. Of course I can speak reasonable swedish now but it took time to learn and it seems English is a very common language in Europe and especially here in Sweden where it is considered a second language.
 
God, Boris Johnson was hopeless last night in the debate. Jeremy Hunt actually looked quite good against him. I suppose it doesn't matter now as I heard that most of the Tory party members have already voted for the next leader anyway.

I'm sorry if i offended you and your politicians. Maybe it's linguistic barrier that worked against me. Because when we say "skol'zkiye" [literally(!): slick], we mean that they're saying one thing, thinking another, and doing - completely different, being led by their own interests.
No, it's fine, insult our politicians all you like, they deserve it!;)
 

Celibataire

Well Known Member
I don't see why a common culture and history matters unless you are the type of person who insists that only those who are like you should live near you - i.e. a bigot. As for language, I have had no trouble at all getting on with Swedes and people from other european countries living in Sweden by speaking english.
Thanks mate, there is nothing bigoted in saying that a political union needs a common culture to be successful, though I am aware that ideological 'Remainers', i.e. pan-Europeanists, believe that everyone who disagrees with them is a 'bigot', but that is a measure of their fundamentalist views. Look into the history of the European project and you'll see why de Gaulle consistently vetoed British membership of what was then the EEC, for the same reason that he rejected that Free France should join a political union with Britain when Churchill offered it to him. As de Gaulle said, Britain looks to the sea (and by implication not to the continent).

As for Sweden, like Britain it is a secular society which is notionally and historically Protestant and with a language that shares a common linguistic root with English. Protestantism in this context is relevant when rejecting the notion of centralised authority. Those who think that a political union can survive without a common culture should ask themselves why both Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union imploded. On more mundate matters, one reason why European Monetary Union has been so disastrous for the economies of Southern Europe is because they don't share the Germanic cultural attitude towards money.
 
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