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UK Brexit aftermath/repercussions

I only just saw what Boris was saying about making models of buses to relax. WTF.:hmm:

I'm not really following it as I don't have any say over who would be the next PM anyway!
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
It wasn't the EU that privatised YOUR Royal Mail.
ORLY?!
Following the 2010 general election, the new Business Secretary in the coalition government, Vince Cable, asked Richard Hooper CBE to expand on his report, to account for EU Directive 2008/6/EC which called for the postal sector to be fully open to competition by 31 December 2012.[54][55][56] Based on the Hooper Review Update the government passed the Postal Services Act 2011. The Act allowed for up to 90% of Royal Mail to be privatised, with at least 10% of shares to be held by Royal Mail employees.[57]
Source: Royal Mail - Wikipedia
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
According to this video from TLDR News, it sounds like Boris' Brexit strategy, consisting of plans A, B and C, are quite unlikely to work out very well. Plan C, which is to simply leave without a deal, no trade agreement, no transition period and to withhold the £39 billion "divorce settlement", sounds like sheer madness.

So, warning to all UK members: please take your seats and fasten your seatbelts, turbulent times ahead!
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
It feels a bit unreal that the Brexit aftermath and repercussions are still dominating UK politics so long after the 2016 referendum.

This morning I read an editorial on Sky News' site that looks at the price tags on the promises made by BoJo the Clown and the other Tory bloke trying to become the next prime minister - it's quite impressive:
Sky Views: Tories inhabit a fantasy world of Brexit unicorns and magic money trees (3. July 2019)

The UK crashing out of the EU without a deal would be a wet dream for the moron currently in charge in Washington. I bet he'll be ready with his own deal ready to be signed on October 31st, but I don't think it'll be a deal that most brits will want. However, by crashing out of the EU, the UK will need new trade deals to be signed a.s.a.p. so they won't have any leverage in negotiations on such deals.
 
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Celibataire

Well Known Member
Soya milk can go back to being soya milk. Veggie-burgers can still be veggie-burgers. More importantly we'll no longer be financing the Common Agricultural Policy. So with farm subsidies returned to a national level there ought to be more democratic accountability. Instead of being subserviently pro-EU, the Green Party should rediscover the political principles that it used to have and see this as an opportunity. Also, as we'll no longer be subsidising French wine production then English wine should become more economically competitive, given that its market is almost entirely domestic. Bolney Bubbly anyone?
 

Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
Soya milk can go back to being soya milk. Veggie-burgers can still be veggie-burgers.
I like the sound of that. But "can" is not "will", and I'm not convinced anyone who manages to back-stab their way to the top of UK politics will care to make that happen.
More importantly we'll no longer be financing the Common Agricultural Policy. So with farm subsidies returned to a national level there ought to be more democratic accountability.
On the one hand, it's generally easier to fix a problem in a small nation than in a super state. On the other hand, many problems in the UK have been fixed by the EU, e.g. creating standards for air and water quality.
 
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Indian Summer

Cult Leader
Administrator
To clarify my own stance on Brexit: I was surprised when the result of the referendum was announced in 2016. I thought it was brave, but perhaps not the best outcome for the economy and some other sectors like science, at least short and medium term. The future of the EU is also not clear as they have many challenges other besides Brexit. Now in retrospect I don't think the UK electorate should have been voting on the issue at the time. EU membership is a terribly complicated question, and the consequences of leaving can be very dramatic. I think a second referendum is the best solution to the current political pickle, and I hope the outcome of that will be to remain.

I'm Norwegian, and voted against Norwegian membership of the EU in '94, but I realise the cases for and against UK membership are very different.
 

Celibataire

Well Known Member
We could have good standards for air and water quality without the EU, just as we have long had better animal welfare standards than most of the EU. There are numerous things wrong with the EU that cannot be fixed, the recent appointments being obvious ones as the whole nature of the project has always been anti-democratic. In fact I fear that is part of the Green Party's love affair with it. The 'Greens' having boarded the gravy train to Brussels, like the influence that they can impose on other people without those people's consent. In doing so they have divested themselves of the 'small is beautiful' principle - the root of the ecology movement - of society being structured from the bottom-up not the top-down.

With regard to when (if) we leave, we could end up with power cuts if no agreement has been reached on energy trading, given that Britain is now heavily interconnected to continental Europe. Had we left on 29th March there would have been less of a risk, as peak electrical power consumption is lower during April to October then it is during the GMT months.

On the bigger issue, what became known as 'Euroscepticism' has always been the default in Britain and used to be dominant on the political left. Indeed the Single European Act was signed by Margaret Thatcher because she knew that enlarging the labour market was a good way of putting downward pressure on wage settlements; and so it came to pass enabled by her disciple Tony Blair.
 
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The Labour Party kept saying that they would respect the result of the referendum for the past three years (annoying people like me who voted to remain) and now they have probably annoyed a lot of their working class supporters in Northern/Midlands constituencies who voted to leave by saying that they would back Remain next time.:D

The old Labour supporters will probably vote for the Brexit party if there was a General Election now.:fp: I don't blame them either as I would be pissed off if I voted the way they did, especially if I had voted for them in the 2017 election where they said they would deliver Brexit.

I heard that there is a head to head debate between BoJo and Jeremy Hunt tonight on TV.
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
The Labour Party kept saying that they would respect the result of the referendum for the past three years (annoying people like me who voted to remain) and now they have probably annoyed a lot of their working class supporters in Northern/Midlands constituencies who voted to leave by saying that they would back Remain next time.:D

The old Labour supporters will probably vote for the Brexit party if there was a General Election now.:fp: I don't blame them either as I would be pissed off if I voted the way they did, especially if I had voted for them in the 2017 election where they said they would deliver Brexit.

I heard that there is a head to head debate between BoJo and Jeremy Hunt tonight on TV.
I know that it's none of my business, but probably, if i had English citizenship, i would have voted to remain. (Just have been thinking about it recently). It's not appropriate,- what these slick politicians are doing to your country.:mad:
 

Celibataire

Well Known Member
The Labour Party kept saying that they would respect the result of the referendum for the past three years (annoying people like me who voted to remain) and now they have probably annoyed a lot of their working class supporters in Northern/Midlands constituencies who voted to leave by saying that they would back Remain next time.:D

The old Labour supporters will probably vote for the Brexit party if there was a General Election now.:fp: I don't blame them either as I would be pissed off if I voted the way they did, especially if I had voted for them in the 2017 election where they said they would deliver Brexit.
'Old' Labour voters were abandoned by Tony Blair a quarter of a century ago and I for one stopped voting Labour then anyway because it was obvious to me that Blair was/is a Thatcherite, hence his support for the Single European Market; it was Thatcher who signed the Single European Act in 1986 which laid the groundwork for the Treaty on European Union signed by John Major six years later.

The invasion of Iraq, based on lies propagated by Blair's spin doctor Alistair Campbell - who now styles himself as Alistair 'People's Vote' Campbell - resolved to me that I would never vote Labour again in any circumstances. As far as I am concerned, Labour may as well concentrate on its middle-class metropolitan wing.

I know that it's none of my business, but probably, if i had English citizenship,
There is no such thing as English citizenship, there is British citizenship, which is in reality citizenship of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. As a multinational political union at least it has a common language, culture and history which is more than the EU has, ever has had or ever will. Pro-EU 'Remainers' conveniently ignore this.

Personally I'd be more than happy if we let the Irish take back the six counties that we reluctantly IMHO subsidise to the tune of twelve billion quid a year (including the one billion that Theresa May threw at the DUP). The Irish would then have to live with the huge job losses in the public sector, whilst we could then have a hard border in the Irish Sea, with no more nonsense about a 'backstop'.
 
As far as I am concerned, Labour may as well concentrate on its middle-class metropolitan wing.
Yes, the Labour Party despise the working class. All they like is the metropolitan class, the benefits class and the students.

Their name is sort of ironic. They should change it to something else.
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
I really wouldn't call them slick, lol!
I'm sorry if i offended you and your politicians. Maybe it's linguistic barrier that worked against me. Because when we say "skol'zkiye" [literally(!): slick], we mean that they're saying one thing, thinking another, and doing - completely different, being led by their own interests.
 

Val

Extraterrestrial
'Old' Labour voters were abandoned by Tony Blair a quarter of a century ago and I for one stopped voting Labour then anyway because it was obvious to me that Blair was/is a Thatcherite, hence his support for the Single European Market; it was Thatcher who signed the Single European Act in 1986 which laid the groundwork for the Treaty on European Union signed by John Major six years later.

The invasion of Iraq, based on lies propagated by Blair's spin doctor Alistair Campbell - who now styles himself as Alistair 'People's Vote' Campbell - resolved to me that I would never vote Labour again in any circumstances. As far as I am concerned, Labour may as well concentrate on its middle-class metropolitan wing.


There is no such thing as English citizenship, there is British citizenship, which is in reality citizenship of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. As a multinational political union at least it has a common language, culture and history which is more than the EU has, ever has had or ever will. Pro-EU 'Remainers' conveniently ignore this.

Personally I'd be more than happy if we let the Irish take back the six counties that we reluctantly IMHO subsidise to the tune of twelve billion quid a year (including the one billion that Theresa May threw at the DUP). The Irish would then have to live with the huge job losses in the public sector, whilst we could then have a hard border in the Irish Sea, with no more nonsense about a 'backstop'.
Why are people so opinionated? We don't hold a grudge on Finnish people who call Russia "Venäjä", just because of Vistula Veneti ethnic group, who lived behind the borderline in ancient times. I even like this name. I really don't think that it's such a crime that here we say England, meaning Great Britain (which is certainly weird, tbh). But(!) if i ever come to the UK, you can find me and arrange a serious conversation on the subject, so i would feel guilty for the rest of my life.☺
 
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