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10 Foods Never Give to Dogs & Cats

Mischief

Stranger in a strange land
Since they are warning against raw bones, they should also mention that cooked bones, especially cooked chicken bones, are hazardous - much more so than raw bones.
 
I'm a bad kitty mom. Tyler loves Tofurky slices, bean burritos and avocadoes. Gizmo loves all fruit and Daiya cheddar shreds, Chico is picky, but also likes the shreds. They don't get it all the time, but bites here and there.
 
V

vegannatasha

Guest
My cat loves the non virgin coconut oil. lol It helps fur balls. I had 2 cats years ago that loved it as well.
:kitty::cat::mcat:
 

Tom

Addicted Poster
Location
Upstate New York
I wouldn't have even thought to give a cat or dog salt (which is on the list of things not to give them). Their food normally contains adequate amounts of it, and they don't sweat as humans do- so I would not have thought they needed it. Xylitol was a surprise for me- but since it's usually in sweet things , which aren't normally things I'd give a cat or dog, I don;t think I would have given them that, either (well, not intentionally).

I never really figured out whether my cats genuinely wanted what I was eating, or if they just wanted "some of Daddy's food!" I honestly think it was the latter; I always investigated whether or not something might make them sick before I let them have anything. That might be how I found out about grapes, avocado, and garlic/onion (also on the list of things toxic to our pets).
 

GingerFoxx

No effin' whey!
I wouldn't have even thought to give a cat or dog salt (which is on the list of things not to give them). Their food normally contains adequate amounts of it, and they don't sweat as humans do- so I would not have thought they needed it. Xylitol was a surprise for me- but since it's usually in sweet things , which aren't normally things I'd give a cat or dog, I don;t think I would have given them that, either (well, not intentionally).

I never really figured out whether my cats genuinely wanted what I was eating, or if they just wanted "some of Daddy's food!" I honestly think it was the latter; I always investigated whether or not something might make them sick before I let them have anything. That might be how I found out about grapes, avocado, and garlic/onion (also on the list of things toxic to our pets).
A childhood friend of mine nearly lost her weimaraner last summer because he ate some sugarless gum with xylitol she did not realize was within the dog's reach. The dog's kidneys shut down and I think he may have had seizures until after several harrowing days at the vet's office he was back to normal. So yeah, that's definitely one to be taken seriously. It's an added ingredient in a lot of sugarless or "diet" food products. One prime example that sometimes becomes an issue for dog owner especially is reduced calorie peanut butter. Peanut butter is often put inside those Kong brand dog chew toys as a treat. The wrong brand of peanut butter can have dire consequences.
 

GingerFoxx

No effin' whey!
My ex's chihuahua had a close call a couple years ago. I buy instant oatmeal packets to keep in my desk at work as an easy/filling mid-morning snack. I had a brand new, unopened box of raisin spice flavor oatmeal inside a zipped backpack, tucked between the wall and a piece of furniture in my bedroom. While unattended, the dog pulled the bag free, unzipped it, tore the box open and devoured most the oatmeal packets.

A quick estimation from an online search indicated the volume of raisins in that single box was likely enough to cause dangerous problems for a 7 or 8lb dog. At the recommendation of his vet's after hours answering service, we gave the dog a small amount of hydrogen peroxide and he promptly vomited them all back up.

Granted, I had a strong dislike for that dog, but I never would have wanted anything horrific to happen to him.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
A childhood friend of mine nearly lost her weimaraner last summer because he ate some sugarless gum with xylitol she did not realize was within the dog's reach. The dog's kidneys shut down and I think he may have had seizures until after several harrowing days at the vet's office he was back to normal. So yeah, that's definitely one to be taken seriously. It's an added ingredient in a lot of sugarless or "diet" food products. One prime example that sometimes becomes an issue for dog owner especially is reduced calorie peanut butter. Peanut butter is often put inside those Kong brand dog chew toys as a treat. The wrong brand of peanut butter can have dire consequences.
No words. :(
 
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vegannatasha

Guest
Poor little dog!

How come u disliked the doggie?:( Dogs are awesome!:dog::doggy:
 
M

Moll Flanders

Guest
I read a warning on a pet forum about xylitol being in some brands of yoghurt and people not realising and giving yoghurt to their pets and making them ill or possibly putting their life at risk.
 

shyvas

Deity
Forum Moderator
I read a warning on a pet forum about xylitol being in some brands of yoghurt and people not realising and giving yoghurt to their pets and making them ill or possibly putting their life at risk.
That's scary. :( Having discussed this with other dog owners, many of them are not aware of these foods that are dangerous to their dogs.
 

GingerFoxx

No effin' whey!
Poor little dog!

How come u disliked the doggie?:( Dogs are awesome!:dog::doggy:
The reasons why would make for a long unnecessary story, but that dog and I specifically had a very tenuous relationship. I love most dogs. It's just like people, not everyone clicks.

Trust me though, for all our issues with each other, I was relieved nothing major happened and we caught him in time. My ex was very fortunate too, since I don't think he was aware of the danger at the time, until I told him how toxic raisins could be.
 
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